VAX-D: Treating Back Pain Without Surgery (cont.)

Allan E. Dyer, MD, PhD, who developed VAX-D, explains how the treatment "fixes" herniated disks, a frequent cause of lower back pain: "Your bones are separated by a cushion. That cushion is always under positive pressure, even at rest. VAX-D lowers that pressure to negative levels by creating a partial vacuum that can retract the disk. Even a large, protruding disk can be retracted where it's supposed to be," he says. Dyer recommends that patients undergo 20 treatment sessions for optimal results.

VAX-D Medical Technologies, manufacturer of VAX-D, recommends the treatment for people suffering from herniated or degenerated disks resulting in low back pain and/or sciatica. But it's not for everyone, including those with spine tumors, osteoporosis, infection, cancer, severe and unstable spondylosis (spinal arthritis), and many other conditions. "Noncandidates can be ruled out by X-rays," Dyer says.

The Issue of Safety

Is VAX-D safe? Apparently, that depends on whom you ask, and under what circumstances the treatment is performed.

While the manufacturer touts VAX-D as safe, literature on VAX-D from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in California lists the following risks: development of sharp, burning, or radiating pain during treatment; stress to the shoulder and rotator cuff muscles; and overstretching of the soft tissues of the back.

As for the potential to experience pain, Dyer says: "The patient participates by holding hand grips. The patient can always let go, a natural reaction if pain is experienced."

The clinician also plays an important role. "With good clinicians, patients do not experience shoulder pain," Dyer tells WebMD. "The practitioner needs to be a good clinical observer."

Can patients suffer injuries during VAX-D treatment? Current literature from the VAX-D manufacturer states that "not one single injury has been sustained by a patient." A published report in a 2003 issue of Mayo Clinical Proceedings disputes that statement. The report describes a severe complication suffered by a patient during VAX-D treatment. The authors describe a "sudden, severe exacerbation of radicular pain" during a treatment session. Images of the subject's lumbar region showed significant enlargement of the disk protrusion after VAX-D, requiring emergency surgery. To date, this is the only published report of an adverse effect caused by VAX-D.

How Effective Is It?

Does VAX-D really work? To date, anecdotes such as that reported by Reiner and others offer the most persuasive evidence in favor of VAX-D's effectiveness. But what do studies tell us about VAX-D?