Feature Archive

Taking NSAIDs? Protect Your Tummy

You can reduce the risk of stomach problems when taking pain relievers -- but there are no guarantees.

By Jeanie Lerche Davis
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Charlotte Grayson

Nearly every arthritis sufferer has taken a traditional painkiller like aspirin or Aleve. They are a great solution for relieving pain and inflammation, but there's a definite downside. These drugs often lead to more trouble including upset stomach and bleeding ulcers.

There are some 20 traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs, including aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), and piroxicam (Feldene).

These drugs can bother the GI tract in a number of different ways, says Robert Hoffman, MD, chief of rheumatology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "Gastritis, esophageal reflux disease [heartburn or GERD], and bleeding ulcers are all problems that can develop from NSAIDs."

Though there are a few things you can do to reduce stomach upsets, there are no guarantees that serious problems won't develop - serious enough to mean hospitalization and even death, he adds. Older people with other medical problems are at especially increased risk.