Feature Archive

When Breast Cancer Comes Back

Recurrence is always possible. But when the cancer comes back, where it is and how it behaves all affect the outcome.

By Gina Shaw
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Charlotte Grayson

It can happen a year after you finish treatment for breast cancer, or five, 10, even 20 years later. You find another lump, or a shadow appears on one of the mammograms you're having much more often now. Is the cancer back?

Every woman who's had breast cancer knows that recurrence is possible. Some may do a better job than others at keeping that worry in a tightly closed box on the other side of the room. But sometimes -- such as at follow-up visits with the oncologist -- it's hard to avoid.

And sometimes, the worry proves true. After all you and your doctors did, after those scary and exhausting and painful months of treatment, the cancer is rearing its ugly head again.

How often does breast cancer recur? That depends on a number of factors, including:

  • Size of the original tumor
  • Number of lymph nodes involved, if any
  • How aggressive the cancer was
  • How well you responded to your first course of treatment

For example, if your original tumor was less than 1 centimeter and had not spread to the lymph nodes, the chance of the cancer's returning may be only 5%. If you had a large tumor with multiple lymph nodes involved, the odds that it will in time recur can be significantly higher -- 50% or greater for some women.