Feature Archive

Women's Health: Then and Now

The book Our Bodies, Ourselves first made its mark during the women's movement in the 1970s, but how far has women's health come since then?

WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario

If you're a woman, you probably have some association with the groundbreaking book Our Bodies, Ourselves -- whether you found it on your mother's bookshelf as a preteen and gleefully drank up the "dirty" information within its pages or whether, as a grown woman, you turned to it for the kind of honest advice you couldn't find anywhere else.

First published at the height of the women's movement in 1973 (think burning bras, Gloria Steinem, and the Roe v. Wade ruling), the book has since gone through many incarnations. With the newest edition just out, the time seems ripe for comparing the 21st century woman with her predecessors. How has women's health care changed in the past three decades -- and how do women view themselves -- their health, their bodies, and their sexuality -- now vs. then?

Just the fact that we take for granted the notion of "women's health" is a huge difference, says Judy Norsigian, one of the original authors of the book and executive director of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective. "There used to be this massive, gaping hole," she says. "There was nothing at all about women's health and sexuality that was in lay language, and even college-educated women were totally ignorant about their bodies."

These days, medical research is routinely done on women, whereas it wasn't three decades ago. And there are many more female physicians.