Dentistry: Do-It-Yourself Dentistry (cont.)

For example, "if I were going to Europe with a temporary crown on my teeth, I would see my dentist prior to my trip to make sure everything is stabilized," says Warren Scherer, DDS, the chairman of the department of general dentistry and management science at New York University College of Dentistry in New York City.

But if a toothache should occur, a crown should fall out, your gums become inflamed, or any other dental emergency crops up, don't panic; there are easy things you can do to stop the pain and preserve the function until you can visit a dentist.

First things first, rinse the area with warm salt water to flush it out and make sure there is no debris that may be causing the discomfort, Howley says. Traditional over-the-counter pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol), and Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin) may also help curb the pain. "If the pain is due to the underlying layer of your teeth -- the dentin -- becoming exposed, you want to cover the area with sugar free gum or wax," he says. Some drug stores sell kits with material to plug up the exposed area. But, he cautions, such do-it-yourself sealants are usually only good for 48 hours. "Get to the dentist as soon as possible." If you should fall and break or chip a tooth, cover the exposed area in the same manner, he says. And don't fret if you swallow it because 99% of time it will pass uneventfully.

Find a Filling?

If a filling falls out, try and keep the lost piece to show your dentist. It's also important to keep the tooth clean by brushing gently with toothpaste and lukewarm water and to avoid eating in this area. "There are temporary restorative materials that contain zinc oxide that are sold over-the-counter that can plug up the hole until you see the dentist," says Warren Scherer, DDS, the chairman of the department of general dentistry and management science at New York University College of Dentistry in New York City. Two such products include Temparin and Dentemp OS. These products are the same as those that can be used to cover an exposed tooth surface.

Coronation Ceremony

Crowns or caps fully cover the portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line. But if you lose one, you have to try and put it back in, Howley says. Here's how: Clean it out thoroughly, and either buy paste in a drugstore or mix your own with Vaseline and corn starch. "Mix it to be a pretty thick paste," he says. Then, put the paste in the crown, place it on the tooth, and bite down gently until it's seated. "Wipe off extra glue that will seep out," he says. "It doesn't taste great."

"You can use crazy glue to replace a tooth off a denture, but that becomes more problematic because the consumer may have difficulty refitting that tooth," Sherer says. "If I were attending a wedding or had a meeting with the queen, I would crazy glue my tooth in, but if I could wait a day or so, then I would," he says. Partial dentures are mounted on a metal frame and fill a gap left by missing teeth. Complete dentures may be worn when all of the top or bottom teeth have been lost. They consist of artificial teeth mounted in a plastic base molded to fit the mouth.