Feature Archive

New Treatments for Breast Cancer

These advances in treating breast cancer aren't on the horizon. They're here, right now.

By Gina Shaw
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Charlotte Grayson

While some promising new treatments for a href="/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=298">breast cancer are years away from regular treatment regimens, others are on the market or just around the corner.

Still on the horizon for treating breast cancer are anti-angiogenesis drugs. They block the formation of new blood vessels that feed tumors and help them grow. These drugs have shown promise in treating colon cancer and are now being studied in patients with advanced breast cancer. But it may be some time before these drugs have been studied enough to make the leap to treating early-stage breast cancer.

Even so, new breast cancer treatments are available now. Over the past year, doctors have learned a lot more about many targeted therapies that very soon may be helping millions of women live longer and healthier lives after learning they have breast cancer.

Abraxane and Albumin-Bound Nanoparticle Drugs

In January, headlines trumpeted the release of a new chemotherapy drug for breast cancer called Abraxane. Technically, Abraxane isn't a new drug -- it's an exciting new way of delivering an existing drug.

Paclitaxel, commonly marketed as Taxol or Taxotere, is part of many chemotherapy drug regimens, but it has one big problem, says Clifford Hudis, chief of the Breast Cancer Medicine Service at New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. "It doesn't dissolve in water, which means we have to put the drugs in solvents to deliver them to patients." Those solvents can cause a number of side effects, including severe allergic reactions. Patients taking paclitaxel have to receive heavy doses of other medications first, such as steroids and antihistamines, before getting their chemotherapy.