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Coming Out About Mental Illness

You've just been diagnosed with a mental illness. Now what? Here's how to tell the people you love.

By Sarah Albert
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario

Getting a diagnosis for depression -- or any mental illness -- is no easy task, but getting validation and treatment can be a great relief.

The hard part for many people is telling family, friends, and other loved ones about the diagnosis, given the prevalence of stigma and ignorance in regards to mental illness. It's important that you take the disclosure process seriously, and protect yourself. The good news is you have control over who you tell, and WebMD can help guide you through the process. The following expert advice will also help you if you're the caregiver, partner, parent, or friend of someone with a mental illness.

Coming to Terms With Your Feelings

It's an unfortunate fact that not everyone is going to support your decision to seek treatment for a mental illness; some people may not even believe mental illnesses exist. "Society stigmatizes mental illness," says Joan A. Lang, MD, professor and chair of the department of psychiatry at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. This can make the process of telling people about your condition extremely challenging. "An awful lot of the trepidation stems from the fact that there is still a lot of stigma and people who are very ignorant and insensitive, but it also comes from internalized stigma."