Feature Archive

Is Your Medication Working Overtime?

Many medications on the market today are prescribed for one condition but have been found to help others as well. Is your drug doing double duty?

By Carol Sorgen
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Michael Smith

Many medications on the market today are prescribed for one condition but have been found to help others as well. Is your drug doing double duty?

"Many drugs do have added benefits," says Marc Siegel, MD, clinical associate professor at New York University School of Medicine. Aspirin, for example, can not only treat headaches, but it also reduces the risk of heart attack and has been shown to possibly lower the risk of breast and colon cancer, to name just a few of its benefits.

Sometimes a drug is studied for one purpose and is then found to have another effect. Siegel says researchers investigating Viagra as a heart medication, for example, found that it caused erections; as a result, it became a best-selling treatment for erectile dysfunction. It has also been found to be an effective therapy for altitude sickness and can reverse the libido-lowering effect of antidepressants in women, Siegel says.

Beta-blockers are another multipurpose class of drugs, Siegel says. They not only lower blood pressure, but they can also be used to treat the pain of angina, slow heart rate and prevent disturbances in heart rhythm, prevent migraines, and stave off panic attacks and stage fright by preventing a surge in adrenaline.