Ionizing Radiation Fact Sheet (cont.)

Risks of Health Effects

All people are chronically exposed to background levels of radiation present in the environment. Many people also receive additional chronic exposures and/or relatively small acute exposures. For populations receiving such exposures, the primary concern is that radiation could increase the risk of cancers or harmful genetic effects.

The probability of a radiation-caused cancer or genetic effect is related to the total amount of radiation accumulated by an individual. Based on current scientific evidence, any exposure to radiation can be harmful (or can increase the risk of cancer); however, at very low exposures, the estimated increases in risk are very small. For this reason, cancer rates in populations receiving very low doses of radiation may not show increases over the rates for unexposed populations.

For information on effects at high levels of exposure, scientists largely depend on epidemiological data on survivors of the Japanese atomic bomb explosions and on people receiving large doses of radiation medically. These data demonstrate a higher incidence of cancer among exposed individuals and a greater probability of cancer as the level of exposure increases. In the absence of more direct information, that data is also used to estimate what the effects could be at lower exposures. Where questions arise, scientists try to extrapolate based on information obtained from laboratory experiments, but these extrapolations are acknowledged to be only estimates. For radon, scientists largely depend on data collected on underground miners. Professionals in the radiation protection field prudently assume that the chance of a fatal cancer from radiation exposure increases in proportion to the magnitude of the exposure and that the risk is as high for chronic exposure as it is for acute exposure. In other words, it is assumed that no radiation exposure is completely risk free.

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (www.epa.gov)


Last Editorial Review: 6/30/2005