Feature Archive

Age Raises Infertility Risk in Men, Too

Risks associated with men's biological clocks may be similar to women's.

By Elizabeth Heubeck, MA
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD

On playgrounds across the country, it's getting tougher to tell who's watching the kids -- dad or granddad. Experts predict the trend of older fathers will continue creeping upward. Why the rise and, more importantly, at what cost?

"The women set the baby-making agenda," says Harry Fisch, MD, director of the Male Reproductive Center at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York and author of The Male Biological Clock: the Startling News about Aging and Fertility in Men. As more and more women wait to have children, their spouses are forced to postpone parenthood, too. Back in 1970, less than 15% of all men fathering children were over 35. Today, that percentage has risen to almost one-quarter. Even among men in the 50 to 54 age group, there's been a notable increase in fatherhood.

While it has become more socially acceptable to put off fatherhood, experts caution that the decision is not without risks.

"The role of the male in infertility has been grossly overlooked by lay and professionals alike," says Peter Schlegel, MD, urologist-in-chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center, and president of the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology.