The Cleveland Clinic

Sleep Disorders: Sleep-Related Eating Disorders

Sleep-related eating disorders are characterized by abnormal eating patterns during the night.

Although it is not as common as sleepwalking, nocturnal sleep-related eating disorder (NS-RED) can occur during sleepwalking. People with this disorder eat while they are asleep. They often walk into the kitchen and prepare food without a recollection for having done so. If NS-RED occurs often enough, a person can experience weight gain and develop type 2 diabetes.

A closely related disorder, known as night eating syndrome (NES), is diagnosed when a person eats during the night with full awareness and may be unable to fall asleep again unless he/she eats.

Symptoms of NES include the following and often persist for at least two months:

  • Little or no appetite for breakfast.
  • Eating more food after dinner than during the meal.
  • Eating more than half of daily food intake after dinner hour.

NS-RED and NES differ in that people with NES eat when they are conscious. However, the disorders are similar in that they both are hybrids of sleep and eating disorders. Both of these conditions can interfere with an individuals nutrition, cause shame, and result in depression and weight gain.