Feature Archive

Protein Power

What It Is

The popularity of low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets is at an all-time high, thanks to a number of best-selling books. Among them is Protein Power, which graced the New York Times best-seller list for over a year, sparking controversy with its assertion that the mainly carbohydrate-based diet --fruits, vegetables, and starches -- is responsible for rampant obesity and heart disease, not the traditionally named culprits such as red meat, eggs, and dairy products.

Written by a married couple of MDs, Michael R. and Mary Dan Eades, the book promises that you will "feel fit and boost your health -- in just weeks!" The cover includes praise from one of their diet-expert-author competitors, Barry Sears, author of The Zone, who calls their book nothing less than "The Nutritional Primer of the Nineties."

What sets Protein Power apart is the wealth of historical information about low-carbohydrate diets and how these have influenced dieters galore, ever since William Banting wrote his Letter on Corpulence in the mid 1800s. The Eades also provide scientific explanations for the functions of insulin and glucagons, the major hormones involved in the food-to-fuel process, along with plenty of encouragement and practical suggestions, such as what to order in a French restaurant or fast food joint.