Migraine headache

A Guide to Migraine Headaches
Our Migraine Headache Main Article provides a comprehensive look at the who, what, when and how of Migraine Headache

Medical Definition of Migraine headache

Migraine headache: The most common type of vascular headache involving abnormal sensitivity of arteries in the brain to various triggers resulting in rapid changes in the artery size due to spasm (constriction). Other arteries in the brain and scalp then open (dilate), and throbbing pain is perceived in the head. The tendency to migraine is inherited and appears to involve serotonin, a chemical in the brain involved in the transmission of nerve impulses that trigger the release of substances in the blood vessels that in turn cause the pain of the migraine. These nerve impulses cause the flashing lights and other sensory phenomena known as an aura that may accompany a migraine. Not all severe headaches are migraines and not all migraines are severe.

Factors known to make migraines worse in some patients include stress, food sensitivities, menstruation, and the onset of menopause. Most patients will feel better if they lie down and avoid bright lights. Prevention measures can include taking preventative medication (usually an antispasmodic) and avoiding any known migraine triggers. Medication is also available that can ease the pain of a current migraine.


Quick GuideMigraine or Headache? Migraine Symptoms, Triggers, Treatment

Migraine or Headache? Migraine Symptoms, Triggers, Treatment

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Reviewed on 5/13/2016

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