The Cleveland Clinic

Allergies: Living with an Egg Allergy

Egg allergy -- especially to egg whites -- is more common in children than in adults and reactions range from mild to severe. Mild reactions tend to involve the skin and gastrointestinal tracts. Severe allergy can be instantaneous.

If you suffer from an egg allergy, strictly avoiding eggs and food containing egg and egg products is the only way to prevent a reaction. But, it is not always easy to avoid these foods since many unsuspecting products contain eggs.

Always check the label ingredients before you use a product. In addition, check the label each time you use the product. Manufacturers occasionally change recipes, and a trigger food may be added to the new recipe. Also, keep in mind that some egg substitutes contain egg white.

Examples of egg products and foods that may contain eggs include:

Egg Products Egg-Containing Ingredients Egg-Containing Foods
Eggs

Egg whites

Egg yolks

Dried eggs or egg powder

Egg solids

Globulin

Albumin

Apovitellenin

Livetin

Ovalbumin

Ovomucin

Ovomuciod

Ovovitellin

Phosvitin

Eggnog

Bavarian creams

Breaded foods (some)

Cake

Candy (some)

Caesar salad dressing

Cookies (especially chocolate chip)

Creamed foods

Cream pies

Cream puffs

Crepes

Custard

Doughnuts

Egg rolls

Egg noodles

Frosting

Hollandaise sauce

Ice cream

Mayonnaise

Marshmallows

Meat or fish cooked in batter

Meringue

Muffins

Pretzels

Pudding

Simplesse (fat substitute)

Souffles

Tartar sauce

Waffles

Some wines

Anything fried or batter-fried

Reviewed by the doctors at The Cleveland Clinic Department of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine.

SOURCE: The Food Allergy Initiative

Reviewed by Walter M. Ryan, DO, February 1, 2007.

Portions of this page © The Cleveland Clinic 2000-2005


Last Editorial Review: 4/2/2007



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