Separating the Beef from Bacteria

Despite the FDA's federal prose (below), this is an interesting story. Lactoferrin is a natural protein found in dairy products. When lactoferrin is applied to meat, it helps protect the meat against many different types of harmful bacteria, including E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter.

Lactoferrin is one of the proteins responsible for providing protection to infants before their immune systems begin to function. It is found in high concentrations in mother's milk. It is a minor protein in cow's milk (0.3% by weight) and is extracted from skim milk or whey through protein separation.

Lactoferrin is an iron-binding protein. It acts as an antimicrobial agent by tying up the iron required by bacteria for growth and by its ability to detach bacteria from meat surfaces and eliminate bacterial attachment structures, making them incapable of colonizing and multiplying.

For more information, please visit the following MedicineNet.com areas:

Barbara K. Hecht, Ph.D.
Frederick Hecht, M.D.
Medical Editors, MedicineNet.com


Lactoferrin to Fight E. Coli on Raw Beef