Home Fire Safety Quiz

Do You Know How To Protect Your Home From a Wildfire?

During the summer months wildfires are common and often threaten nearby homes. Take this MedicineNet Quiz from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), and test your "Wildfire Home Safety IQ!" Just click on either True or False after each question.

  1. Wildland fire travels uphill slowly. True or False


  2. There is very little you can do to aid firefighters near your home. True or False


  3. Untreated wood shake roofs are the leading cause of wildland fire losses. True or False


  4. Burning firebrands or embers can collect in the same space that leaves and pine needles do. True or False


  5. Create a survivable space, safety zone or "fire break" around your home. True or False


  6. In many jurisdictions, outdoor burning is allowed during dry days, or on days with high winds. True or False


  7. When using barbecue grills on decks or patios, it is necessary to leave sufficient space from siding and eaves. True or False

Answers to the Fire Safety I.Q. Quiz

1. False

Wildland fire travels uphill rapidly - make sure that your home won't be in its path. If you're moving to a new home in a rural area or buying land to build a new home, do a thorough outdoor fire safety check before you proceed. Locate the home on the lot with adequate setback from downhill slopes.

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2. False

Remember, local fire departments are often overwhelmed by major wildland fires. What you do around your house can make the difference between loss and survival. Make sure that the area has adequate public fire protection available. Make sure that  emergency vehicles have easy access to your house, that your address is clearly visible from the road, and that there is  water supply  access for the firefighters (know the location of the nearest fire hydrant, and available garden hoses). 

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3. True

Untreated wood shake roofs are the leading cause of wildland fire losses. Make your roof fire safe. A roof made of fire-resistant or non-combustible materials can make your home safer. Also, use non-combustible (metal) screening in eave vents and for windows.

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4. True

Burning firebrands or embers can collect in the same space that leaves and pine needles do. Sweep gutters, roofs, and eaves regularly and remove dead branches from around or near chimneys. Remove leaves and needles from cellar window walls and from corners and crevices around the outside of your home. By keeping the roof and area surrounding your home clear of debris, you reduce your risk of fire during the hot, dry fire season.

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5. True

Create a survivable space, safety zone or "fire break" around your home. Flammable (highly resinous) plants, woodpiles, and debris should be kept as far away from the exterior walls of the home as possible. Fences, decks, or outbuildings connected to the house must be considered part of the house; construct them out of non-combustible materials and keep them clear of pine needles, dead leaves, etc.

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6. False

In many jurisdictions, outdoor burning is prohibited during dry days, or on days with high winds. Check with your local authorities about burning regulations. Don't burn trash outdoors, as sparks from the fire may generate wind-blown sparks and can inadvertently trigger a blaze.

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7. True

When using barbecue grills on decks or patios, be sure to leave sufficient space from siding and eaves. Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use. Keep children and pets far away from grills.

So, how did you do?

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Source: National Fire Protection Association


Last Editorial Review: 6/20/2002