Rheumatoid Arthritis - 2001 National Meeting (cont.)

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common rheumatic disease, affecting more than two million people in the United States. The disease is three times more common in women than in men. It afflicts people of all races equally. The disease can begin at any age, but most often starts after age forty and before sixty. In some families, multiple members can be affected, suggesting a genetic basis for the disorder.

There is no known cure for RA. The treatment of RA optimally involves a combination of patient education, rest and exercise, joint protection, medications, and occasionally, surgery. Currently, doctors feel that the earlier patients with RA receive aggressive treatment, the better their long-term outcome.

Below are perspectives on key reports presented at the recent national meeting of the American College of Rheumatology:

New Treatments

Some of the biggest new from this year's meeting related to the newer medications used to treat RA. Here are summaries in this area:

Remicade (infliximab)

Remicade (infliximab) is an antibody that blocks the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). TNF-alpha is a substance made by cells of the body that has an important role in promoting inflammation. By blocking the action of TNF-alpha, infliximab reduces the signs and symptoms of inflammation.

Remicade was a topic in over 100 papers presented at the meeting, most of which related to RA. Remicade, an approved treatment for RA, is given by intravenous infusion every 2 months.

Researchers at this meeting reported Remicade to be effective and safe in treating RA. Some reported an 80% significant response rate in the first year of use.

Dr. Shiel's Perspective: This is my experience with this medication. Very effective in calming the pain, stiffness, and swelling from the inflammation due to arthritis in a high percentage of patients.