Exercise Therapy in Diabetes - Part 2 (cont.)

Studies have shown that patients taking insulin who reduced the dose of their short-acting insulin by 33 to 50% before exercising were able to prevent the onset of exercise-related hypoglycemia. While hypoglycemia can occur during or directly after activity, it can also occur 6 to12 hours after exercise. Caution is therefore recommended during this period as well.

For patients who exercise regularly and need insulin therapy, an insulin pump is a great option for delivery. The pump provides a constant infusion of insulin that can be adjusted and allows for an extra amount to cover meals. With the aid of a doctor or nurse trained in pump therapy, the dosing can be adjusted to fit exercise regimens. The only activities for which the pump may not be well suited are swimming and sports involving vigorous movements. These activities can dislodge the cannula, the tube through which the insulin is infused into the body.

Some strategies to avoid hypoglycemia are listed below:

  • Measure blood sugars before, during, and after exercise.
  • For planned exercise, if you are on insulin, reduce the short-acting insulin by 33 to 50%.
  • For unplanned exercise, take 30 to 20g of carbohydrates extra for each 30 minutes of exercise.
  • Avoid injecting insulin into the arms and legs and use the abdomen because the insulin will be absorbed more evenly.
  • If you exercise in the evening, you may need to add a snack before bedtime to make certain your sugars don't go too low at night.

Diabetes, Exercise, and Small Blood Vessel Disease

Patients with diabetes often have eye disease, whether they have symptoms or not. The eye disease associated with diabetes results from the formation of small, fragile, easily breakable blood vessels in the back of the eye (retina). When these vessels break, bleeding in the back of the eye occurs. Continued damage can result in loss of vision.

In patients with extensive eye disease related to diabetes (diabetic retinopathy), the intensity and type of exercise may need to be limited. Activities that should be avoided include excessive straining (as in weight lifting), excessively jarring activities (such as boxing), and exercise that involves severe pressure changes (like diving). If there is early eye disease and no new vessel formation, no limitations are necessary. If kidney disease is present, the only precaution is avoiding exercise that can raise blood pressure.