Dry Eyes and Contact Lenses

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A properly fit contact lens should ride or float on the eye on a thin film of fluid (tear film). With each blink, this film of fluid between the contact lens and the eye is replaced with fresh fluid, allowing debris to be washed away and fresh oxygen that is dissolved in the fluid to reach the cornea. If this film is compromised in quantity or quality, the contact lens may become uncomfortable or even unhealthy to wear.

At each examination, the eye doctor will evaluate the fit of the contact lens and look for signs of early damage to the cornea that may be a result of a compromised tear film. If the contact lens itself is the problem, changing the lens curvature, diameter, or material may correct the problem. Sometimes the chemicals in multipurpose storage solutions for contact lenses can cause changes to the eye's surface that mimic chronic dry eye, and this can be eliminated by switching to a hydrogen-peroxide based cleansing system. Other causes of compromise include exposure to chronic wind and dust, and incomplete or infrequent blinking, such as when staring at a computer for long periods without resting the eyes.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/1/2014

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