Hypnobirthing: Calmer Natural Childbirth (cont.)

Despite the variety of programs, the philosophy remains the same: nature intended for women to give birth relatively easily, but the fear of childbirth incites physical pain.

"We have convinced ourselves that labor is risky," says Marie Mongan, MEd, MHy, founder of HypnoBirthing - The Mongan Method.

Fear during labor activates our primal fight-or-flight mechanism, causing stress hormones called catecholamines to slow down digestion, make the heart speed up, force blood to the arms and legs, and ultimately deplete blood flow to the uterus, creating uterine pain and hindering the labor process.

According to Mongan, who is a hypnotherapist and hypnoanesthesiologist, it is physically impossible for the body to be relaxed and in fight-or-flight mode. By replacing fear with relaxation, a different set of chemicals come into play: oxytocin, labor hormones called prostaglandins, and endorphins combine to relax the muscles and create a sense of comfort.

What Hypnobirthing Teaches

"At my very first pregnancy appointment, I said ‘I want to do this without drugs,'" Wall recalls. But when she brought up the popular Bradley method, which focuses heavily on the support of a childbirth partner to help cope with pain, her doctor suggested hypnobirthing as an easier alternative.

Wall and her husband took Mongan's HypnoBirthing course, consisting of five classes, 2 1/2 hours each. Courses cost between $275 to $350, depending on location and provider.

With the help of a course book and hypnosis CDs, Wall and her husband learned breathing and visualization techniques. She was taught to envision an easy birth, with her cervix opening wide, allowing the baby to come out effortlessly.

Every day, they practiced affirmations like, "I relax and my baby relaxes," and "My baby is the perfect size for my body." Her husband later repeated those key phrases to her as he coached her during labor.

Wall says daily practice helped her eliminate distractions and reach a state of deep relaxation earlier each time.

She also learned to reject references to difficulty during childbirth, replacing the words "contraction" and "pain," with terms such as "surge" and "sensation" instead.

Other hypnobirthing courses teach similar techniques with some variations.

"Hypnobabies" trains mothers to self-hypnotize with their eyes completely open during the process, says Carol Thorpe, one of its hypnotherapist doulas. Thorpe says the course also provides comprehensive childbirth training beyond self-hypnosis.

Still other hypnobirthing methods allow for parents to take a whole course in one day, or entirely at home.

Calm Approach

Diana Weihs, MD, Wall's delivering ob-gyn, estimates about 5% of her patients have used hypnobirthing.