The Worst Headache of Your Life: Brain Hemorrhage Symptoms

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"Doctor, I have the worst headache of my life." Those words send up a warning when a doctor walks into a room to see the patient. The textbooks say that this symptom is one of the clues that the patient may be suffering from a subarachnoid hemorrhage (brain hemorrhage) from a leaking cerebral aneurysm. These words don't mean that a disaster is waiting to happen, but the red flag is waving. If those words are associated with a patient who is lying very still, complaining of a stiff neck, and has difficulty tolerating the lights in the room, this makes the suspicions rise even higher. Add vomiting and confusion as associated symptoms, and the sirens are going off in the doctor's head. Something bad is happening and time is critical.

There are four major blood vessels that supply the brain: two carotid arteries, right and left, that are located in the front of the neck and two vertebral arteries that are located in the back of the neck. They join together at the base of the brain forming an arterial loop known as the Circle of Willis, and from there smaller arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood to the far corners of the brain. There is a potential that one of the connecting points of those four major arteries can be weak.