Safe Use of Flea and Tick Products in Pets

Fleabites may be more than an itchy annoyance to some dogs and cats. They can cause flea allergy dermatitis—an allergic reaction to proteins in flea saliva. And a pet's constant scratching can cause permanent hair loss or other skin problems. Fleas feasting on your pet's blood can lead to anemia and, in rare cases, death.

Ticks can also harm your pet, transmitting infections such as Lyme disease. And pets can bring ticks into the home, exposing you and your family to illness from a tick bite.

Hundreds of pesticides, repellents, and growth inhibitors are available to protect your pet from flea and tick bites. Some of these products are available only from a veterinarian; others can be bought over the counter.

Flea and tick products range from pills given by mouth to collars, sprays, dips, shampoos, powders, and “spot-ons,” liquid products squeezed onto the dog's or cat's skin usually between the shoulder blades or down the back. A few spot-on products are available for flea control in ferrets, and fly and tick control in horses.

Pet owners need to be cautious about using flea and tick products safely, says Ann Stohlman, V.M.D., a veterinarian in the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Veterinary Medicine. “You need to take the time to carefully read the label, the package insert, and any accompanying literature to make sure you're using the product correctly.”

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Regulation of Flea and Tick Products

Flea and tick products for pets are regulated by either FDA or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

FDA is responsible for regulating animal drugs; however, some products to control external parasites come under the jurisdiction of EPA. FDA and EPA work together to ensure adherence to all applicable laws and regulations. In general, flea and tick products that are given orally or by injection are regulated by FDA.

Before an animal drug is allowed on the market, FDA must “approve” it. Before a pesticide can be marketed, EPA must “register” it.

Both agencies base their decision on a thorough review of detailed information on the product's safety and effectiveness provided by the manufacturer or other product sponsor. The sponsor must show that the drug or pesticide meets current safety standards to protect

  • the animal
  • people in contact with the animal
  • the environment

The sponsor must also show that the drug or pesticide produces the claimed effect, and the product must carry specific labeling so that it can be used according to the directions and precautions.

After a product is allowed on the market, manufacturers are required by law to report any side effects of their flea or tick products to the regulating agency.

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Caution with Spot-On Products

In April 2009, EPA issued an advisory concerning spot-on pesticide products for flea and tick control in cats and dogs. The advisory applies to approximately 70 products registered by EPA.

EPA is intensifying its evaluation of these products due to recent increases in the number of reported bad reactions. The reactions range from mild skin irritation to skin burns, seizures, and, in some cases, death. In May 2009, EPA met with registrants of spot-on pet pesticide products to discuss pet incident reports and EPA's plans for enhanced evaluation of these products. EPA's evaluation may result in actions such as additional label restrictions or cancellation of registration to remove certain spot-on products from the market.

Spot-on flea and tick products can be effective treatments, and many people use the products with no harmful effects to their pets. EPA does not advise pet owners to stop using spot-ons, but asks them to use caution and make informed decisions when selecting treatment methods.

EPA advises pet owners to

  • carefully follow label directions and monitor their pets for any signs of a bad reaction after application, particularly when using these products for the first time
  • talk to a veterinarian about responsible and effective use of flea and tick products

Health Canada (the Canadian federal health department) has identified similar concerns about the use of spot-on flea and tick products, and is working with EPA to address the issue.