Salmonella Food Poisoning (Salmonellosis)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

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Quick GuideSalmonella Outbreak

Salmonella Outbreak

What is the prognosis of Salmonella food poisoning?

Most cases of salmonellosis resolve completely without long-term complications, but bowel habits may be abnormal for months. About 380 people die from salmonellosis each year in the U.S.

Is it possible to prevent Salmonella food poisoning?

There is no vaccine available to prevent Salmonella infection. However, one can take the following steps to reduce the likelihood of getting the infection:

  • Wash hands thoroughly after using the bathroom.
  • Cook meats and eggs thoroughly.
  • Do not consume raw eggs or unpasteurized milk.
  • Wash hands and kitchen surfaces with soap and water after contact with raw meat or eggs.
  • Do not allow uncooked meats to come in contact with other foods in the kitchen, including utensils and work surfaces that will be used to prepare other foods.
  • Wash hands thoroughly after contact with animal feces and after all contact with reptiles, birds, and small rodents.
  • Chill foods after serving and when transporting from place to place.

REFERENCES:

Klochko, Alena. "Salmonellosis." Medscape.com. Oct. 8, 2015. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/228174-overview>.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Salmonella." Feb. 23, 2016. <http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/>.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/3/2016

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