Rosacea

  • Medical Author:
    Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD

    Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideRosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Rosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Is rosacea like acne?

Rosacea is different than acne, although the two can coexist. It is occasionally called "adult acne." Unlike common acne, rosacea occurs most often in adults (ages 30-50), especially in those with fair skin. As opposed to acne vulgaris, rosacea is devoid of blackheads. Furthermore, most teens eventually outgrow acne whereas patients with rosacea don't generally outgrow it. Rosacea consists mostly of small red bumps. People with rosacea tend to have a rosy or pink color to their skin as opposed to acne patients, whose skin is usually less red.

Rosacea strikes both sexes and potentially all ages. It tends to be more frequent in women but more severe in men. It is very uncommon in children, and it is less frequent in people with dark skin.

Reviewed on 5/2/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Del Rosso, James Q. "Advances in Understanding and Managing Rosacea: Part 1 & 2: Connecting the Dots Between Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Common Clinical Features of Rosacea With Emphasis on Vascular Changes and Facial Erythema." J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 5.3 Mar. 2012.

Margalit, Anatte, et al. "The Role of Altered Cutaneous Immune Responses in the Induction and Persistence of Rosacea." Journal of Dermatological Science 82 (2016): 3-8.

Two, Aimee M., and James Q. Del Rosso. "Kallikrein 5-Medicated Inflammation in Rosacea." The Journal of Clinical Aesthetic Dermatology 7.1 Jan. 2014: 20-25.

IMAGES:

1.Getty Images

2.Getty Images

3.iStock

4.Getty Images

5.Getty Images

6.iStock

7.By M. Sand, D. Sand, C. Thrandorf, V. Paech, P. Altmeyer, F. G. Bechara [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

8.iStock

9.iStock

10.iStock

11.iStock

12.Getty Images

13.iStock

14.iStock

15.Interactive Medical Media LLC.

16.Getty Images

17.Getty Images

18.Istock

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Skin Care & Conditions Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors