Ringworm

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideRingworm: Treatment, Pictures, Causes, and Symptoms

Ringworm: Treatment, Pictures, Causes, and Symptoms

Types of ringworm: tinea corporis and tinea cruris. What are the symptoms?

Tinea corporis: When fungus affects the skin of the body, it often produces the round spots of classic ringworm. Sometimes, these spots have an "active" outer border as they slowly grow and advance. Sometimes, scaling, crusting, raised areas, or even blister-like lesions can appear, particularly in the active border. It is important to distinguish this rash from other even more common rashes, such as nummular eczema. This condition, and others, may appear similar to ringworm, but they are not due to a fungal infection and require different treatment.

Tinea cruris: Tinea of the groin ("jock itch") tends to have a reddish-brown color and extends from the folds of the groin down onto one or both thighs. Other conditions that can mimic tinea cruris include yeast infections, psoriasis, and intertrigo, a chafing rash that results from the skin rubbing against the skin. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 5/11/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Lesher Jr., Jack L. "Tinea Corporis." Medscape.com. Dec. 9, 2013. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1091473-overview>.

Rashid, Rashid M. "Tinea in emergency medicine." Medscape.com. Mar. 9, 2011. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/787217-overview>.

Rashid, Rashid M., and Andrew C. Miller. "Tinea." eMedicine. Dec. 10, 2014. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/787217-overview>.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Ringworm." Dec. 4, 2015. <http://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/ringworm/>.

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