Ringworm

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideRingworm: Treatment, Pictures, Causes, and Symptoms

Ringworm: Treatment, Pictures, Causes, and Symptoms

What causes ringworm?

Although the world is full of yeasts, molds, and fungi, only a few cause skin problems. These agents are called the dermatophytes (which means "skin fungi"). An infection with these fungi is medically known as dermatophytosis. Skin fungi can only live on the dead layer of keratin protein on top of the skin. They rarely invade deeper into the body and cannot live on mucous membranes, such as those in the mouth or vagina.

Scientific names for the most common of the dermatophyte fungi that cause ringworm include Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton interdigitale, and/or Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis, and Epidermophyton floccosum. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 5/11/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Lesher Jr., Jack L. "Tinea Corporis." Medscape.com. Dec. 9, 2013. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1091473-overview>.

Rashid, Rashid M. "Tinea in emergency medicine." Medscape.com. Mar. 9, 2011. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/787217-overview>.

Rashid, Rashid M., and Andrew C. Miller. "Tinea." eMedicine. Dec. 10, 2014. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/787217-overview>.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Ringworm." Dec. 4, 2015. <http://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/ringworm/>.

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