Ringworm

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Catching Ringworm From Pets

Animals can also be affected by ringworm and may transmit the condition to humans. In this case, ringworm is an example of a zoonotic disease, or a disease transmitted from animals to humans. Although catsare affected by ringworm more than dogs, dogs are also commonly affected. In animals, ringworm causes raised, circular areas that frequently are crusted over and associated with hair loss.

Quick GuideRingworm: Treatment, Pictures, Causes, and Symptoms

Ringworm: Treatment, Pictures, Causes, and Symptoms

Ringworm facts

  • Ringworm is a common fungal infection of the skin and is not due to a worm.
  • The medical term for ringworm is tinea. The condition is further named for the site of the body where the infection occurs.
  • Some types of ringworm infection include tinea corporis, tinea capitis, tinea pedis ("athlete's foot"), and tinea cruris ("jock itch").
  • Ringworm causes a scaly, crusted rash that may appear as round, red patches on the skin.Other symptoms and signs of ringworm include patches of hair loss or scaling on the scalp, itching, and blister-like lesions.
  • Ringworm is contagious and can be passed from person to person.
  • Ringworm can be successfully treated with antifungal medications used either topically or orally.
Reviewed on 5/11/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Lesher Jr., Jack L. "Tinea Corporis." Medscape.com. Dec. 9, 2013. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1091473-overview>.

Rashid, Rashid M. "Tinea in emergency medicine." Medscape.com. Mar. 9, 2011. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/787217-overview>.

Rashid, Rashid M., and Andrew C. Miller. "Tinea." eMedicine. Dec. 10, 2014. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/787217-overview>.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Ringworm." Dec. 4, 2015. <http://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/ringworm/>.

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