Rheumatic Fever (cont.)

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What are symptoms and signs of rheumatic fever?

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As mentioned above, there are quite a few symptoms associated with rheumatic fever. These include

  1. carditis (inflammation of the heart), which occurs in 60% of patients is the most severe symptom of ARF and can result in permanent damage to the heart valves, and can be life threatening;
  2. polyarthritis or migratory polyarthritis (joint inflammation), which usually presents first and occurs in 45% of patients and most commonly affects the large joints such as the knees;
  3. Aschoff bodies (subcutaneous skin nodules), which are firm, painless lumps most frequently found around the wrists, elbows and knees. These are present in only 2% of patients;
  4. erythema marginatum (rash), which occurs in 5% of patients and often described as a "serpiginous" with a wavy and snakelike appearance which has distinct erythematous (red) borders or "margins";
  5. Sydenham's chorea (abnormal movements) occurs in 30% of patients and is a movement disorder comprising of purposeless volatile movements of the face and arms. This was also called St. Vitus' dance, which was named after the patron saint of the "mania dancers" of the middle ages; and
  6. fever is often present during the acute infection with group A strep and is present during the initial phase of rheumatic fever.

How is rheumatic fever diagnosed?

The person must have a history of an infection with group A streptococcal bacteria, either by laboratory documentation (a positive rapid strep test) or positive strep culture, and must have two major or one major and two minor Jones criteria findings.

How is rheumatic fever treated?

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The first step in treating rheumatic fever is to eradicate the bacteria which initially caused the immunologic response. This is usually accomplished with the use of penicillin. For penicillin-allergic patients, there are other options such as erythromycin (E-Mycin, Eryc, Ery-Tab, PCE, Pediazole, Ilosone) or azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax). It is important to make sure that the acute infection is treated, but such treatment won't necessarily change the course of rheumatic fever once the immunologic response has begun. Your doctor will decide on the best treatment option for you. The joint pains are treated with aspirin or aspirin-related medications. It may be necessary to use very high doses to decrease the symptoms.

Carditis is treated by high-dose steroids but other cardiac medications may be needed to control the inflammation of the heart. This is a serious condition and is most often initially managed in an acute-care setting such as a hospital.

The most difficult and unpredictable symptom to treat is the chorea (involuntary movements). It often responds to antipsychotic medications such as haloperidol (Haldol) but may continue for a protracted period. For patients who develop Sydenham's chorea, it can be the most difficult of the symptoms, since it involves involuntary movements and can interfere with daily activities. These individuals must remain on chronic long-term antibiotics to prevent recurrence of the strep infection, which has been known to cause recurrence of the chorea.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/8/2014

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