Retinal Detachment

  • Medical Author:
    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, FACS

    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, is a board-certified ophthalmologist. Dr. Dahl's educational background includes a BA with Honors and Distinction from Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, and an MD from Cornell University, where he was selected for Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society. He had an internal medical internship at the New York Hospital/Cornell Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

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Why is it mandatory to treat a retinal detachment?

A tear or hole of the retina that leads to a peripheral retinal detachment causes the loss of side (peripheral) vision. Almost all of those affected will progress to a full retinal detachment and loss of all vision if the problem is not repaired. The dark shadow or curtain obscuring a portion of the vision, either from the side, above, or below, almost invariably will advance to the loss of all useful vision. Spontaneous reattachment of the retina is rare.

Early diagnosis and repair are urgent since visual improvement is much greater when the retina is repaired before the macula or central area is detached. The surgical repair of a retinal detachment is usually successful in reattaching the retina, although more than one procedure may be necessary. Once the retina is reattached, vision usually improves and then stabilizes. Successful reattachment does not always result in normal vision. The ability to read after successful surgery will depend on whether or not the macula (central part of the retina) was detached, the extent of time that it was detached and whether any scar tissue developed related to the detachment or the surgery.

What types of doctors treat retinal detachment?

Ophthalmologists treat retinal detachment. An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor who is specialized in eye and vision care. Although all ophthalmologists are trained in the diagnosis of retinal detachment, most surgery for retinal detachment is performed by ophthalmologists who have chosen to sub-specialize in vitreoretinal surgery.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/10/2016

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