respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin,human (rsv-igiv)-inj, Respigam

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GENERIC NAME: RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IMMUNE GLOBULIN,HUMAN (RSV-IGIV)-INJ (res-PIR-a-tor-ee SIN-sish-al VYE-rus i-MUNE-GLOB-ue-lin)

BRAND NAME(S): Respigam

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

USES: This medication is used in infants who have lung disease (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia) or who were born prematurely. It is used to prevent severe lung infections caused by a certain virus (RSV). This medication is made from healthy human blood that has a high level of certain defensive substances (antibodies). These antibodies help the body to fight infections caused by RSV. Using this medication has been shown to reduce the severity of the RSV infection, thereby reducing the number and length of hospital stays caused by RSV.

HOW TO USE: This medication is given by injection into a vein by a health care professional. Dosage is based on your child's weight, medical condition, and response to treatment.The health care professional will start the medication slowly while monitoring your child closely. If there are few or no side effects, the medication will be given faster.This medication is usually given before the start of the RSV season, then given monthly throughout the RSV season (e.g., November through April, depending on area).If you are giving this medication to yourself at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.Your child should receive this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, mark the days on the calendar when your child needs to receive the medication.

SIDE EFFECTS: Fever, nausea/vomiting, dizziness, flushing, chest tightness, muscle/joint pain, or pain/swelling at the injection site may occur. Tell your child's doctor or pharmacist promptly if any of these effects occur, persist, or worsen. The infusion may need to be stopped or given more slowly.Remember that the doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to your child is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell the doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: change in the amount of urine, swelling ankles/feet, sudden weight gain, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, changes in skin color/temperature.This medication is made from human blood. Even though donors are carefully screened and this medication goes through a special manufacturing process, there is a very small chance that your child may get infections from the medication (e.g., viral infections such as hepatitis). Tell the doctor immediately if your child develops any signs of hepatitis/another infection, including fever, persistent sore throat, unusual tiredness, persistent nausea/vomiting, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine.Treatment with this medication may rarely cause a serious swelling of the brain (aseptic meningitis syndrome) several hours to 2 days after treatment. Get medical help right away if your child develops severe headache, drowsiness, high fever, eye pain/sensitivity to light, muscle stiffness, or severe nausea/vomiting.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact the doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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