Rash

  • Medical Author:
    Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD

    Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideRosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Rosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Rashes produced by bacterial infections

The most common bacterial infections of the skin are folliculitis and impetigo. Staph or strep germs may cause folliculitis and/or impetigo, two conditions that are much more common in children than adults. Eruptions caused by bacteria are often pustular (the bumps are topped by pus) or may be plaque-like and quite painful (such as with cellulitis). Rarely, streptococcal sore throat can produce scarlet fever, a rash affecting large areas of skin. Rashes produced by certain classes of bacteria, Rickettsia or spirochetes, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and secondary syphilis respectively, are often able to be suspected clinically.

Viral exanthems

Rashes that characteristically occur as part of certain viral infections are called exanthems. Many rashes from viruses are more often symmetrical and affect the skin surface all over the body, including roseola and measles. Sometimes certain viral rashes are localized to the cheeks, such as parvovirus infections (fifth disease). Other viral infections, including herpes or shingles, are mostly localized to one part of the body. Patients with such rashes may or may not have other symptoms like coughing, sneezing, localized burning ,or stomach upset (nausea). Viral rashes usually last a few days to two weeks and resolve on their own.

Reviewed on 5/2/2017
References
REFERENCES:

Bolognia, Jean L., Joseph L. Jorizzo, and Ronald P. Rapini. Dermatology, 2nd Ed. Spain: Mosby, 2008.

Rawlin, Morton. "Exanthems and Drug Reactions." Australian Family Physician 40.7 July 2011: 486-489.

IMAGES:

1.Getty Images

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5.Color Atlas of Pediatric DermatologySamuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

6.iStock

7.Getty Images

8.Color Atlas of Pediatric Dermatology Samuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

9.iStock

10.Wikipedia

11.iStock

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