Rash

  • Medical Author:
    Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD

    Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideRosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Rosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Rashes produced by fungal, viral, or bacterial infection

When infections appear as rashes, the most common culprits are viral, fungal, or bacterial infections.

Symptoms, signs, and treatment of fungal infections

Fungal infections are fairly common but don't appear nearly as often as rashes in the eczema category. Perhaps the most common diagnostic mistake made by both patients and physicians is to almost automatically call scaly rashes "a fungus." For instance, someone with several scaly spots on the arms, legs, or torso is much more likely to have a form of eczema or dermatitis than actual ringworm (the layman's term for fungus). Likewise, yeasts are botanically related to fungi and can cause skin rashes. These tend to affect folds of skin (like the skin under the breasts or the groin). They look fiery red and have pustules around the edges. As is the case with ringworm, many rashes that are no more than eczema or irritation get mislabeled "yeast infections."

Fungus and yeast infections have little to do with hygiene -- clean people get them as well. Despite their reputation, fungal rashes are not commonly acquired from dogs or other animals. They seem to be most easily acquired in gyms, showers, pools, or locker rooms or from other family members. Treatment is usually straightforward. Many effective antifungal creams can be bought at the drugstore without a prescription, including 1% clotrimazole (Lotrimin, Mycelex) and 1% terbinafine (Lamisil). In extensive cases, or when toenails are involved, a prescription drug like oral terbinafine may be useful.

If a fungus has been repeatedly treated without success, it is worthwhile considering the possibility that it was never really a fungus to begin with but rather a form of eczema. Eczema is treated entirely differently. A fungal infection can be independently confirmed by performing a variety of simple tests.

Reviewed on 2/17/2016
References
REFERENCE:

Bolognia, Jean L., Joseph L. Jorizzo, and Ronald P. Rapini. Dermatology. 2nd ed. Spain: Mosby, 2008.

IMAGES:

1.Getty Images

2.iStock

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5.Color Atlas of Pediatric DermatologySamuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

6.iStock

7.Getty Images

8.Color Atlas of Pediatric Dermatology Samuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

9.iStock

10.Getty Images

11.Wikipedia

12.iStock

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