Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6)

Are there any interactions with medications?



Phenytoin (Dilantin)
Interaction Rating: Major Do not take this combination.

The body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin) to get rid of it. Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenytoin. Taking pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and taking phenytoin (Dilantin) might decrease the effectiveness of phenytoin (Dilantin) and increase the possibility of seizures. Do not take large doses of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) if you are taking phenytoin (Dilantin).



Amiodarone (Cordarone)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Amiodarone (Cordarone) might increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) along with amiodarone (Cordarone) might increase the chances of sunburn, blistering, or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.



Phenobarbital (Luminal)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

The body breaks down phenobarbital (Luminal) to get rid of it. Pyridoxine might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenobarbital (Luminal). This could decrease the effectiveness of phenobarbital (Luminal).



Levodopa
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

The body breaks down levodopa to get rid of it. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) can increase how quickly the body breaks down and gets rid of levodopa. But this is only a problem if you are taking levodopa alone. Most people take levodopa along with carbidopa (Sinemet). Carbidopa prevents this interaction from occurring. If you are taking levodopa without carbidopa, do not take vitamin B6.

Dosing considerations for Pyridoxine (vitamin B6).

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For vitamin B6 deficiency in adults: the typical dose is 2.5-25 mg daily for three weeks, then 1.5-2.5 mg per day as maintenance treatment.
  • For vitamin B6 deficiency in women taking birth control pills: the dose is 25-30 mg per day.
  • For symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS): the daily dose is 50-100 mg. Doses as high as 500 mg per day have been used, but daily doses over 100 mg don't appear to have additional benefit, and may increase the risk for harmful side effects.
  • For hereditary sideroblastic anemia: initially 200-600 mg per day is used, decreasing to 30-50 mg daily after improvement.
  • For kidney stones: 25-500 mg daily has been used.
  • For treating tardive dyskinesia: 100 mg per day has been increased weekly up to 400 mg per day, given in two divided doses.
  • For preventing macular degeneration: 50 mg daily in combination with vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) 1000 mcg, and folic acid 2500 mcg.
  • For nausea during pregnancy: 10-25 mg pyridoxine three or four times daily has been used; alternatively, 75 mg of sustained-release pyridoxine combined with 12 mcg vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), 1 mg folic acid, and 200 mg calcium (PremesisRx) is used daily as an FDA-approved prescription product for nausea during pregnancy.
The daily recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) of vitamin B6 are: Infants 0-6 months, 0.1 mg; Infants 7-12 months, 0.3 mg; Children 1-3 years, 0.5 mg; Children 4-8 years, 0.6 mg; Children 9-13 years, 1 mg; Males 14-50 years, 1.3 mg; Males over 50 years, 1.7 mg; Females 14-18 years, 1.2 mg; Females 19-50 years, 1.3 mg; Females over 50 years, 1.5 mg; Pregnant women, 1.9 mg; and breast-feeding women, 2 mg. Some researchers think the RDA for women 19-50 years should be increased to 1.5-1.7 mg per day. The recommended maximum daily intake is: Children 1-3 years, 30 mg; Children 4-8 years, 40 mg; Children 9-13 years, 60 mg; Adults, pregnant and breast-feeding women, 14-18 years, 80 mg; and Adults, pregnant and breast-feeding women, over 18 years, 100 mg.


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