PUVA Therapy (Photochemotherapy) Index

Featured: PUVA Main Article

PUVA is an acronym. The P stands for psoralen, the U for ultra, the V for violet and the A for that portion of the solar spectrum between 290 and 320 nanometers in wavelength. PUVA was originally developed to treat psoriasis.

Medications

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