Psoriasis (cont.)

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Where can I get more information on psoriasis?

Your dermatologist, the American Academy of Dermatology at http://www.AAD.org, and the National Psoriasis Foundation at http://www.psoriasis.org/home/ may be excellent sources of more information.

There are many ongoing clinical trials for psoriasis all over the United States and in the world. Many of these clinical trials are ongoing at academic or university medical centers and are frequently open to patients without cost.

Clinical trials frequently have specific requirements for types and severity of psoriasis that may be enrolled into a specific trial. Patients need to contact these centers and inquire regarding the specific study requirements. Some studies have restrictions on what recent medications have been used for psoriasis, current medication, and overall health.

Some of the many medical centers in the U.S. offering clinical trials for psoriasis include the University of California, San Francisco Department of Dermatology, the University of California, Irvine Department of Dermatology, and the St. Louis University Medical School.

Is there a national psoriasis support group?

Yes, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) is an organization dedicated to helping patients with psoriasis and furthering research in this field. They hold national and local chapter meetings. The NPF web site (http://www.psoriasis.org/home/) shares up-to-date reliable medical information and statistics on the condition.

What is my long-term prognosis with psoriasis? What are complications of psoriasis?

Overall, the prognosis for most patients with psoriasis is good. While it is not curable, it is controllable. Recent studies show an association of psoriasis and other medical conditions, including obesity and heart disease.

What does the future hold?

Psoriasis research is heavily funded and holds great promise for the future. Just the last five to 10 years have brought great strides forward in treatment of the disease with medications aimed at treating the overactive immune system that causes the skin inflammation of psoriasis. Ongoing research is needed to decipher the ultimate underlying cause of this disease.

REFERENCE:

Villaseñor-Park, Jennifer, David Wheeler, and Lisa Grandinetti. "Psoriasis: Evolving Treatment for a Complex Disease." Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine 79.6 June 2012: 413-423.

IMAGES:

1. MedicineNet / iStock/ Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine Klaus Wolff, Lowell A. Goldsmith, Stephen I. Katz, Barbara A Gilchrest, Amy S. Paller, David J. Leffell Seventh Edition Copyright 2008, 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved. Pg 169.

2. Getty Images/Photodisc (elbows), Interactive Medical Media LLC (fingers), iStock (knees), iStock (scalp)

3. Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved.

4. Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved.

5. Medscape

6. National Psoriasis Foundation

7. Bigstock

8. Bigstock

9. iStock

10. Getty Images / Digital Vision

11. iStock

12. Image included with permission and copyrighted by First DataBank, Inc.

13. Image courtesy of National Biological Corporation

14. Bigstock

15. Bigstock


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/2/2014

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