Pseudogout

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP
    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Dr. Balentine received his undergraduate degree from McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. He attended medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine graduating in1983. He completed his internship at St. Joseph's Hospital in Philadelphia and his Emergency Medicine residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in the Bronx, where he served as chief resident.

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Are there special circumstances that can promote attacks of pseudogout?

Arthritis attacks of pseudogout can be precipitated by dehydration and not infrequently follow surgical procedures in elderly patients.

What are complications of pseudogout?

Pseudogout can be complicated by difficulty in walking and injury to the cartilage and bone of affected joints.

What is the prognosis of pseudogout?

The outlook of pseudogout is generally very good. Aggressive treatment of the inflammation can lead to complete resolution of the inflammation, pain, tenderness, and loss of joint function. While this can last for weeks, the inflammation of resolves within days with proper treatment.

Recurrent attacks of pseudogout and chronic joint inflammation can lead to injury to the affected cartilage and bone.

Is it possible to prevent pseudogout?

Patients with known pseudogout should stay well hydrated before and after operations to minimize the risk of attacks of pseudogout. Resting the joints may help during a flare-up.

What specialists treat pseudogout?

Pseudogout is treated by general practitioners, family practitioners, internists, rheumatologists, and orthopedists.

Where can people get more information about pseudogout?

People can get more information about pseudogout from the Arthritis Foundation.

REFERENCES:

American College of Rheumatology National Meeting, 2011.

Fauci, A.S., and C.A. Langford. Harrison's Rheumatology. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical Publishing, 2006.

Koopman, William, et al., eds. Clinical Primer of Rheumatology. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2003.

Ruddy, Shaun, et al., eds. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Co., 2000.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/18/2015
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