Pseudogout

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP
    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Dr. Balentine received his undergraduate degree from McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. He attended medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine graduating in1983. He completed his internship at St. Joseph's Hospital in Philadelphia and his Emergency Medicine residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in the Bronx, where he served as chief resident.

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What are treatments for pseudogout?

The treatment of pseudogout is directed toward stopping the inflammation in the joints. Local ice applications and resting can help. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil) and others are often first drugs of choice.

Removing fluid containing the crystals from the joint can reduce pain and help the inflammation to diminish more quickly. Cortisone injected into an inflamed joint will also help decrease the inflammation. Colchicine (Colcrys) is a medication used to decrease inflammation in patients with gout and may also be helpful in pseudogout. Corticosteroids taken as a pill can help if the patient can't tolerate colchicine or NSAIDs.

Long-term prevention of recurrent pseudogout is often best achieved with small daily doses of colchicine and optimal hydration.

What other conditions can accompany pseudogout?

Pseudogout can occur along with aging, be inherited, or be associated with hemophilia, hemochromatosis, ochronosis, amyloidosis, or hormonal disorders (such as hyperparathyroidism and hypothyroidism). These illnesses, as well as others, are considered in the initial evaluation of a patient with pseudogout.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/18/2015

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