prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS:

  • Prochlorperazine Edisylate solution for injection: 5 mg/ml
  • Prochlorperazine Maleate oral tablet: 5 mg, 10 mg
  • Prochlorperazine rectal suppository: 2.5, 5, 25 mg

STORAGE: Prochlorperazine injection solution is recommended to be stored below 30 C (86 F). All other dosage forms may be stored between 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).

Adult dosing

Treatment of severe nausea and vomiting

  • The dosage must be adjusted based on individual patient response.
  • Patients are generally started on the lowest recommended dosage.
  • Oral tablets: The usual recommended dose is one 5 mg or 10 mg tablet orally 3-4 times daily.
  • Rectal suppository: 25 mg twice daily.
  • Intramuscular injection: The usual starting dose is 5 to 10 mg injected deeply into the upper outer quadrant of the buttock. Additional doses may be given every 3 or 4 hours as necessary. Total daily dose should not exceed 40 mg per day except in resistant patients.
  • Intravenous (IV) dosage: The usual recommended dose is 2.5 to10 mg by slow IV injection or infusion at a rate not to exceed 5 mg per minute. A single dose should not exceed 10 mg. The total daily dose should not exceed 40 mg per day.

Adult surgery patients with severe nausea or vomiting

  • The total daily dose should not exceed 40 mg per day.
  • Intramuscular injection: The usual recommended dose is 5 to 10 mg, 1 to 2 hours before the administration of anesthesia. A second dose may be given in 30 minutes if necessary. Repeat doses may also be given to control acute symptoms during and after surgery as needed.
  • IV dosage: The usual recommended dose is 5 to 10 mg as a slow IV injection or infusion 15 to 30 minutes before the administration of anesthesia, or to control acute symptoms during or after surgery.

Adult psychiatric disorders

  • Individual patient dosage is adjusted based on response and severity of the condition. Treatment is started with the lowest recommended dose.
  • Oral dosage: non-psychotic anxiety: The usual recommended dose is 5 mg 3-4 times daily.
  • Psychotic disorders including schizophrenia (mild): The usual recommended dose is 5 to 10 mg 3-4 times daily.
  • Psychotic disorders including schizophrenia (moderate to severe conditions): The recommended usual starting dose in hospitalized or adequately supervised patients is 10 mg 3-4 times daily. Dosage should be increased in small increments every 2-3 days to minimize the occurrence of side effects. Some patients may have a satisfactory response to 50 to 75 mg per day. Patient with severe symptoms may require 100 to 150 mg per day.
  • Intramuscular dosage: For the immediate control of severe schizophrenia symptoms in adult patients, patients may be started with an initial dose of 10 to 20 mg administered deeply into the upper outer quadrant of the buttock. Repeat injections may be given every 2 to 4 hours if necessary.

Pediatric use

Pediatric use (dose calculation) is weight-based and the drug should not be used in children < 2 years old.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/23/2015
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