probenecid, (Benemid - brand no longer available)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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PREGNANCY AND BREASTFEEDING SAFETY: Probenecid has not been adequately studied in pregnant women.

Probenecid has not been adequately studied in nursing mothers.

STORAGE: Probenecid should be stored at room temperature, 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F).

DOSING: The usual adult dose for hyperuricemia is 500 mg twice daily and the maximum dose is 2 grams daily. When combined with penicillin type antibiotics to treat infections, the usual dose is 500 mg 4 times daily. Patients should drink plenty of water in order to prevent formation of kidney stones and take probenecid with food or antacid to reduce stomach upset.

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Probenecid is an oral drug used for reducing blood uric acid levels in patients with hyperuricemia (high uric acid) and/or. High uric acid can cause attacks of gout and kidney stones. Probenecid prevents attacks of gout by reducing uric acid levels in the blood. It does this by preventing the reabsorption of uric acid by the kidney and increasing its excretion from the body in the urine. Probenecid also blocks excretion by the kidney of penicillin and related antibiotics and is used for increasing the levels of the antibiotics in the blood and increasing their effectiveness when treating infections.

Medically reviewed by Eni Williams, PharmD

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/5/2016

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