Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuidePremenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Track and Prevent Symptoms

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Track and Prevent Symptoms

Can exercise help relieve some of the symptoms of PMS (premenstrual syndrome)?

Evidence suggests that exercise can help relieve some of the symptoms of PMS in adolescents young women. Physical activity improves general health and helps relieve nervous tension and anxiety. Exercise is believed to release endorphins. Endorphins contribute to euphoric feelings such as the "runner's high" experienced after prolonged exercise. Endorphins are chemical messengers for nerves (neurotransmitters) that affect mood, perception of pain, memory retention and learning.

Aerobic exercise strengthens the heart and improves overall fitness by increasing the body's ability to use oxygen. Swimming, walking, and dancing are "low-impact" aerobic activities. They avoid the muscle and joint pounding of more "high-impact" exercises like jogging and jumping rope. Benefits include cardiovascular fitness, muscle tone, weight loss or control, decrease in fluid retention, and increase in self-esteem.

Is there a "cure" for PMS (premenstrual syndrome)?

Widespread recognition of PMS has attracted a broad range of research interest in the treatment and management of the symptoms of PMS. Although there is no "cure" for PMS at this time, there are many options for managing its signs and symptoms. The first priority is an accurate diagnosis. Other medical or psychological conditions should be identified and treated. Proper diet, exercise, and lifestyle changes can improve overall health and thereby lead to the reduction of symptoms. If these measures are not effective, over-the-counter or prescription medications may be indicated. Most women can control their PMS symptoms successfully and continue to lead healthy and productive lives.

REFERENCE:

MedscapeReference. Premenstrual Syndrome.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/14/2016

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Women's Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors