Patient Comments: Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs) - Causes

What was the cause of your premature ventricular contractions?

Comment from: ladyk, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: September 17

I have never had premature ventricular contractions (PVC) before and they really scared me. I get them here and there but when I have indigestion or heartburn I belch and they start, but when I go walking or moving around very active I don't feel them at all. But if I am sitting around I can feel them. My doctor told me I could have stress and worry. I may have a few worries. I have changed my diet and losing weight at one time I thought maybe it was me changing my eating habits. She did blood test and they came back normal. But I still need to know so they are doing an ultrasound on me next week and I will be wearing a monitor to see what my heart is doing. I am hoping that everything is ok. My doctor states she may put me on beta blockers to try and stop them. But I promise I will get to the bottom of this issue.

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Comment from: lynnsp, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: January 15

I've been taking ibuprofen lately for lower back pain. I take it rarely. I'm having PVCs (premature ventricular contractions) which leave me breathless and tired. I'm wondering if others have experienced this sensation with Ibuprofen. I've had PVCs in the past but not recently. It's likely I was using Ibuprofen then.

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Comment from: Kim, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: November 25

My premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are due to mitral valve prolapse.

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Comment from: Kevin, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: October 14

Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) occur when I engage in cardio activity such as tennis and riding the elliptical. I have had all major heart tests (echo, nuclear stress and heart catheterization), all of which are normal. I have had chest x-ray and extensive blood work, and all are normal. The result I have been given is that it is nothing to worry about but it is something that I will have to live with. No real known cause but also not harmful because no indication of any heart problem. Very annoying as I enjoy physical exercise which I now have to curtail at least to some degree.

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Comment from: alaa77, 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: June 12

I am football player I have diagnosed with premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) 3 years ago. That time I didn't know what was causing them. I had to do Echo and ECG under stress, it turned out my heart is healthy and these are not harmful as long as they are not too many. By this time I started to concentrate on finding what was causing them and in my case they happen when, 1. I have adrenaline rush. 2. Low magnesium and potassium which is something I found after starting to use supplement that has them, which made my PVC low and controlled. 3. Muscle fatigue 4. Lack of sleep. 5. Lack of movement. More importantly they disappear with exercise. I still have them now but I know how to control them and keep them as low as possible.

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Comment from: JJ, 75 or over Male (Patient) Published: July 21

I have had premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) for 20 years or more. My low dosages of Coreg tend to keep the PVCs under control. I like the 115 to 120 over 70 or so. Occasionally, my pressure drops and I get light headed. My electro physiologist cardiologist says you can have occasional lightheadedness or the PVCs. I choose the prior.

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Patient Comments

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Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs) - Symptoms Question: Please describe the symptoms of your premature ventricular contractions.
Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs) - Experience Question: Have you ever experienced PVCs? Please describe your experience.
Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs) - Treatment Question: What treatments or lifestyle changes did you find effective for your PVCs?

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