prednisolone (Flo-Pred, Pediapred, Orapred, Orapred ODT) (cont.)

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  • Tablets: 5 mg.
  • Tablets (Disintegrating): 10, 15, 30 mg
  • Syrup or Suspension: 5, 10, 15, 20 or 25 mg/5 ml (teaspoon).

STORAGE: Store at room temperature, 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F). Do not refrigerate.

DOSING: Dosage requirements of corticosteroids vary among individuals and the diseases being treated. The usual starting dose range is 5 mg to 60 mg daily depending on the disease being treated. Doses are adjusted based on patient response. In general, the lowest possible effective dose is used. Corticosteroids given in multiple doses throughout the day are more effective, but also more toxic than alternate-day therapy where twice the daily dose is administered every other morning. Prednisolone should be taken with food to reduce irritation of the stomach and intestines.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Rifampin decreases blood levels of prednisolone by increasing its breakdown in the liver. The dose of prednisolone may need to be increased in order to avoid therapeutic failure.

Corticosteroids have variable effects of warfarin (Coumadin) therapy. Coagulation levels should be monitored more closely when anticoagulants are combined with corticosteroids.

Estrogens may increase the levels of prednisolone by decreasing its breakdown. When estrogens are used with prednisolone, side effects of prednisolone should be monitored.

Steroids increase blood sugar (glucose) levels and, therefore, reduce the effect of drugs used for treating diabetes.

Activity of cyclosporine and corticosteroids increase when both drugs are combined. Seizures have been reported.

Combining aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids increases the risk of gastrointestinal side effects.

Combining corticosteroids with potassium-depleting agents (for example, diuretics) increases the risk of low blood potassium (hypokalemia). Vaccines are less effective in patients on prolonged corticosteroid treatment because corticosteroids suppress the immune system. Corticosteroids may also allow organisms contained in live attenuated vaccines to replicate.

PREGNANCY: Prednisolone can cause fetal harm (cleft lip or palate) when used by pregnant women.

NURSING MOTHERS: Prednisolone is secreted in human milk at 5% to 25% of the nursing mother's blood level. High doses of prednisolone may cause growth problems in the infant.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/21/2015

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