prednisolone (Flo-Pred, Pediapred, Orapred, Orapred ODT) (cont.)

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Prednisolone also is used in the treatment of blood cell cancers (leukemias), and lymph gland cancers (lymphomas). Blood diseases involving destruction of platelets by the body's own immune cells (idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura), and destruction of red blood cells by immune cells (autoimmune hemolytic anemia) can also be treated with prednisolone. Other miscellaneous conditions treated with prednisolone include thyroiditis and sarcoidosis. Prednisolone is also used as a hormone replacement in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of corticosteroids.

DOSING: Dosage requirements of corticosteroids vary among individuals and the diseases being treated. The usual starting dose range is 5 mg to 60 mg daily depending on the disease being treated. Doses are adjusted based on patient response. In general, the lowest possible effective dose is used. Corticosteroids given in multiple doses throughout the day are more effective, but also more toxic than alternate-day therapy where twice the daily dose is administered every other morning. Prednisolone should be taken with food.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Rifampin decreases blood levels of prednisolone by increasing its breakdown in the liver. The dose of prednisolone may need to be increased in order to avoid therapeutic failure.

Corticosteroids have variable effects of warfarin (Coumadin) therapy. Coagulation levels should be monitored more closely when anticoagulants are combined with corticosteroids.

Estrogens may increase the levels of prednisolone by decreasing its breakdown. When estrogens are used with prednisolone, side effects of prednisolone should be monitored.

Steroids increase blood sugar (glucose) levels and, therefore, reduce the effect of drugs used for treating diabetes.

Activity of cyclosporine and corticosteroids increase when both drugs are combined. Seizures have been reported.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/7/2014


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