prednisolone (Flo-Pred, Pediapred, Orapred, Orapred ODT)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Psoriasis Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

GENERIC NAME: prednisolone (oral)

BRAND NAMES: Flo-Pred, Pediapred, Orapred, Orapred ODT

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisolone is a synthetic adrenal corticosteroid (cortisone). Corticosteroids are natural substances produced by the adrenal glands located adjacent to the kidneys. Corticosteroids have potent anti-inflammatory properties, and are used in a wide variety of inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. There are numerous preparations of corticosteroids including tablets, capsules, liquids, topical creams and gels, inhalers, eye drops, as well as injectable and intravenous solutions. The FDA approved prednisolone in June 1955.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisolone is used to achieve prompt suppression of inflammation from inflammatory and allergic conditions.

  • Examples of inflammatory conditions include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, acute gouty arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease.
  • Severe allergic conditions that fail conventional treatment may also respond to prednisolone. Examples include bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), drug-induced dermatitis, and contact and atopic dermatitis.
  • Chronic skin conditions treated with prednisolone include dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigus, severe psoriasis and severe seborrheic dermatitis.
  • Chronic allergic and inflammatory conditions of the uvea, iris, conjunctiva, and optic nerves of the eyes are also treated with prednisolone.
  • Prednisolone also is used in the treatment of
  • Prednisolone also is used as a hormone replacement in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of corticosteroids.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/21/2015

Quick GuidePsoriasis Symptoms, Types, Treatment

Psoriasis Symptoms, Types, Treatment
FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

See more info: prednisolone on RxList
RxList Logo

Need help identifying pills and medications?

Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Skin Care & Conditions Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors