potassium supplements-injection

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potassium supplements-injection

GENERIC NAME: POTASSIUM SUPPLEMENTS - INJECTION (poh-TASS-ee-um)

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

USES: Potassium supplements are used to prevent or treat low potassium blood levels caused by diuretics (water pills), poor diet or illness. Symptoms of low potassium include fatigue, weakness, muscle twitching or cramps, dry mouth and excessive thirst.

HOW TO USE: This medication must be administered intravenously and diluted in a proper solution.

SIDE EFFECTS: May cause diarrhea, stomach upset, nausea or vomiting the first few days as your body adjusts to the medicine. Inform your doctor if you develop: breathing difficulties, chest pain, irregular heartbeat, confusion, tingling of the hands or feet. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

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PRECAUTIONS: Be sure your doctor knows your complete medical history especially if you have: kidney problems, heart disease, problems with digestion, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Potassium supplements are not known to appear in breast. milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Inform your doctor about all the medicines you use (both prescription and nonprescription) especially if you take: "water pills" (diuretics such as furosemide or amiloride), ACE inhibitors (e.g., lisinopril), digoxin, salt substitutes containing potassium. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval.

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly.

NOTES: Salt substitutes contain potassium. Talk to your doctor about using a salt substitute. Foods high in potassium include: bananas, citrus fruits, watermelon, cantaloupe, raisins, dates, prunes, avocados, apricots, beans, broccoli, brussels sprouts, spinach, potatoes, yams, lentils, beans, fish, chicken, turkey, ham, beef, and milk.

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, use it as soon as remembered; do not use if it is almost time for the next dose, instead, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up.

STORAGE: Store vial at room temperature away from sunlight. Large volume may need to be refrigerated. Check labeling.

Last Editorial Review: 3/2/2005

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

Reviewed on 3/2/2005
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