Phosphatidylcholine

How does Phosphatidylcholine work?

The body makes a brain chemical called acetylcholine from phosphatidylcholine. Acetylcholine is important for memory and other bodily functions. Since phosphatidylcholine might increase acetylcholine, there is interest in using it for improving memory and for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

Some researchers think phosphatidylcholine acts like a detergent and breaks down fat.

A certain form of phosphatidylcholine (polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine) might provide protection against liver fibrosis and liver damage caused by drinking alcohol, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood.

Are there safety concerns?

Phosphatidylcholine is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or when injected just beneath the skin, short-term. The safety of long-term use is not known.

When phosphatidylcholine is taken by mouth, it can sometimes cause excessive sweating, stomach upset, and diarrhea.

Phosphatidylcholine injections can cause irritation, swelling, redness, itching, burning, bruising, and pain at the injection site. These side effects usually go away over a period of several days.

If phosphatidylcholine is injected directly into a fatty growth (lipoma), it might cause an inflammatory reaction that could make the tumor more fibrous. In one reported case, the patient who had this done had to have the lipoma removed by surgery.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking phosphatidylcholine when you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.


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