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Canine Flu FAQ

Our experts at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center answer the most commonly asked questions about canine influenza virus.

What is the Canine Flu?

Canine influenza is a contagious viral infection of dogs, caused byInfluenza VirusA subtype H3N8.

Did this virus come from the Bird Flu?

No-the canine influenza virus isnota mutation of avian influenza, commonly known as Bird Flu. The avian flu virus of worldwide concern is a different subtype (H5N1). While both are in the same broad, general family of viruses (Orthomyxoviridae) that cause the flu in people, pigs and birds, they are not the same strain. Canine influenza is actually more closely related to the horse or equine influenza virus, and likely mutated from this strain.

What does the Canine Flu do to dogs?

The canine influenza virus can cause mild to severe illness. Mild effects include a soft, moist cough with or without a low grade fever that lasts 10 to 30 days despite treatment, along with yellow/green nasal discharge if a secondary bacterial infection occurs. More severe illness can result in high grade fever as well as rapid/difficult breathing, which is usually caused by secondary pneumonia.

Is Canine Flu fatal?

Typically, most infected dogs develop mild to moderate signs that resolve within 10 to 30 days without problems. As with other flu viruses, fatalities can potentially occur, but are not common and are generally due to secondary complications such as bacterial pneumonia.

Is the virus just in a few states, or is it all over?

Canine Flu is currently considered to be anendemicvirus, meaning that outbreaks have occurred sporadically in certain areas. Currently, outbreaks at dog race tracks have been reported in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Texas, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Outbreaks in pet dogs have occurred in California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, the state of Washington, and Washington, D.C. These cases occurred in animal shelters, rescue groups, pet stores, boarding kennels and veterinary clinics.