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Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats

A cat's upper respiratory tract-the nose, throat and sinus area-is susceptible to infections caused by a variety of viruses and bacteria.

What Causes Upper Respiratory Infections in Cats?

By far, viruses are the most common causes of upper respiratory infections (URIs) in cats. Feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus account for 80 to 90 percent of all contagious upper respiratory problems, and are prevalent in shelters, catteries and multi-cat households. These viruses can be transmitted from cat to cat through sneezing, coughing, or while grooming or sharing food and water bowls. Once infected, cats can become carriers for life, and though they may not show clinical signs, they can still transmit the viruses to others. Cats often develop bacterial infections secondary to these common viral infections.

There are also upper respiratory infections in cats that are primarily caused by bacteria. Chlamydia and Bordetella-also commonly found in shelters and areas with multiple cats-are two such bacterial infections. Less common in cats than dogs, Bordetella is usually associated with stress and overcrowded living conditions.

What Are the General Symptoms of Upper respiratory Infections?

Symptoms differ depending on the cause and location of the infection, but some common clinical signs of upper respiratory problems in cats include:

  • Sneezing
  • Congestion
  • Runny nose
  • Cough
  • Clear to colored nasal discharge
  • Gagging, drooling
  • Fever
  • Loss of or decreased appetite
  • Rapid breathing
  • Nasal and oral ulcers
  • Squinting or rubbing eyes
  • Open-mouth breathing
  • Depression