Homemade and Raw Cat Food (cont.)

A Cooked Diet: The Risks and Rewards

Little scientific evidence exists either for or against a cooked diet for cats.

Some, like Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine, warn against making raw or cooked cat food at home because of the importance of getting the right quantity and proportions of nutrients.

Remillard says she has talked to many cat owners eager to switch to homemade cat food in the wake of melamine poisoning in commercial cat foods. And although she doesn't push homemade cat food diets, she says they can work -- as long as cat owners consult a veterinarian-nutritionist to formulate one.

Raw Meat Diet: A Recipe for Healthy Cats

The following recipe was developed by Pierson. It yields enough food for 10-14 days for the average cat. For more guidelines in making this food, go to www.catinfo.org.

  • 3 pounds of whole fowl or rabbit, including bones, organs, and skin
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eggs (use raw yolks, and lightly cook the whites)
  • 2000 mg wild salmon oil
  • 400 IU vitamin E (powdered E in capsule form works)
  • 100 mg vitamin B-complex (start with a smaller amount when beginning a raw meat diet; the vitamin has a strong odor)
  • 2000 mg taurine, powdered
  • ¾ tsp lite salt with iodine (when using chicken parts)
  • Liver (add 4 oz if the meat you are using does not include organs)
  • Psyllium (add when first introducing the raw meat diet to your cat. See www.catinfo.org for additional information on this ingredient)