Drooling in Cats

Healthy cats do not drool. However, it is common for cats to drool when they know they are going to be given an unpleasant-tasting medicine or receive an injection. This is psychological. A few cats will also drool when they are purring and very relaxed. It is important to know what is normal for your individual cat.

Keep in mind that an animal who drools excessively and acts irrationally could have rabies. Exercise great caution in handling such an animal.

Drooling accompanied by signs of ill health, such as watering of the eyes, is quite likely due to a feline viral respiratory infection. Young cats with liver shunts will drool excessively. Mouth infections and foreign bodies in the mouth are accompanied by drooling. Heat stroke can cause excess salivation, as can certain poisons (such as insecticides and arsenic).

Treatment: This is contingent on identifying the cause of the drooling.

This article is excerpted from “Cat Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook” with permission from Wiley Publishing, Inc.